Well-being Wednesday – Gratitude

The quote we are sharing today provides an important reminder – if we want to cultivate an attitude of gratitude in our children, we must lead by example, living each day with gratitude in our own hearts.
WBW14

For a printable version of this quote, please click here: Weds Quote- 14

 

 

 

Cultivating an Attitude of Gratitude in Your Home

Last week I wrote a post about choosing gratitude in our daily lives.  In that post I shared why I feel this is such a valuable practice and today I want to focus on 5 simple ways you can encourage and cultivate an attitude of gratitude within every member of your home.Attitude of Gratitude Printable

For a printable version of this quote that you can display in your home, click here: Gratitude Printable

  1. Work with your child(ren) to identify wants vs. needs. Ask them to help you list out the things they need to feel safe, comfortable and happy. Then take a few minutes to appreciate just how many (if not all) of their needs are currently being met.  Continue this lesson by asking everyone to be more conscious about using the word need when talking about a want. This is not intended to discourage your family from wanting things in the future. It is simply intended to encourage gratitude for needs that are met even when wants are not.
  2. Talk with your child(ren) about all the different ways they can show gratitude.  Examples could be saying thank you, saying other nice things, giving hugs and smiles, etc. The next time your child is in a situation where it would be appropriate to express gratitude, instead of prompting them to “say thank you”, which they can end up saying almost robotically, simply ask them to remember to “show gratitude”. This allows them to be genuine and thoughtful when figuring the best way to express their gratitude.
  3. Create a family “Lucky List”. In a notebook that you dedicate for only this purpose have each family member make a short list of the items they feel lucky to have in their lives. Take turns sharing your lists. Repeat this practice at an interval that works for your family. This activity is especially fun if you take care to note names and dates by each entry because it allows you to read back through old entries and be reminded of all the ways your family has been blessed through the years.
  4. Help your child(ren) to practice seeing the good. Discuss situations that might feel challenging or disappointing and ask your child to tell you things they could find to be grateful for in those difficult moments. Examples could be; their best friend is absent from school…but now they have the chance to make a new friend, rain cancels their sporting event…but now they get to stay inside and play their favorite board game or their favorite lego creation breaks…but now they get a chance to have fun building it again. Focus on the fact that they can always try to find something good to appreciate in any situation.
  5. Spend time as a family sharing the reasons you are grateful for each other. This works well as a dinnertime activity.  You go around the table and allow each person to state what they appreciate about all the other members of your family. This exercise is beneficial because it provides an opportunity for everyone to take turns expressing gratitude while also allowing the person receiving the compliments to feel grateful for the love and support of their family. Gratitude Text Box